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To be honest, I have absolutely no idea what to write on this page or even how to write it so it's interesting. Words I never want applied to me are average, normal, boring, or beige. I prefer words like colourful, outgoing, energetic, and encouraging. When I read the about page on a site, what interests me is the artist's journey and a sense of their personality so I'll write in that direction and if there's something missing you had hoped to know, please let me know. 

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I was very lucky to find my passion early in life. I sat down at a sewing machine in my grade eight home economics class and fell in love. Since then (over forty years ago) I've developed my skills through individual classes, books, and videos. I am mostly self-taught with no formal training. I've sewn everything from outerwear to lingerie and make the majority of my wardrobe. I love that my clothes are custom designed, fit to my body, and literally one-of-a-kind. Trends don't interest me. Expressing my style and a sense of authenticity does. In 2012, I took a workshop with Marcy Tilton and Diane Ericson that set me on the path to even more individualized and creative clothing. I both sew clothes that I will wear that reflect my style and clothes that I have no intention of wearing but were a lot of fun to put together. And I really enjoy refashioning. It is not uncommon for me to sew something, take it apart, and sew it again in another form. I am warm, dry, safe, fed, clothed, and loved. I don't need another garment; I need another adventure. 

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At that same workshop with Marcy and Diane, I saw some of Diane's textile jewelry and became enthralled with creating my own pieces that were sophisticated and elegant especially as a statement necklace is a signature element of my style. It took me years - literally - to create a first piece that was wearable and not kitschy. I made a lot of less than best pieces while I was practicing that never saw the light of day. I'm wearing that first successful piece - a knot necklace - in the picture above and there's a larger image in the gallery. That goal led me to learn how to weave and wrap wire and how to do metalwork. How we got to where we are is like a dot-to-dot and so fascinating when you look back on your own personal journey. 

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Curiosity is one of the motivating forces behind my work. I'm constantly following up what if and how can I questions and really enjoy blank canvas items like t-shirts or handbags where I can fill the same form over and over again in endless ways. I'm not sure why I have such a fascination for handbags since I typically carry a black one all year round, but I do. They are an especially good way to use remnants which I refer to as bits & pieces of potential. It's so fun to make a garment, take the remnants and make a purse, and then take those remnants and make some jewelry. Free projects!

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I learned to knit in my twenties while working as a hairstylist. The other women taught me the continental style and the four of us would knit in the back room between clients. Now, I knit in group settings for socialization and in the evenings when I just want to sit still with something mindless. Even though I've studied more complicated styles of knitting, I tend to create simple things like shawls and fingerless gloves as well as smaller garments for expected babies and occasionally something for myself.  

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Creativity is a gift that keeps on giving. It is what I refer to as a many black notes occupation where we can start with something simple like Row Row Your Boat and build up to complicated sonatas with a whole lot of movement and never-ending fun. I am grateful for an engaging activity with endless possibilities and I am grateful that at times that activity has been my career and that it has always been nurturing. I breathe in fabric. 


 Myrna